Honoring Women in Neurophysiology

Welcome to March 2021! This month is Women’s History Month, and March 8 is International Women’s Day. We would like to share the stories and impact of 4 female neuroscientists from around the world. These individuals completed neurophysiology research that have greatly advanced our understanding of how neurons communicate with each other. By using tissue slices and sometimes electrophysiology, the work of these women fit perfectly into our company’s passion of improving tissue slicing on a global scale.

Anne Beaumanoir (France)

Dr. Beaumanoir is a French neurophysiologist born in Brittany in 1923. During World War II, she was a medical student in Marseille, eventually becoming a professor of neurology. In 1965, she moved to Switzerland where she became the director of neurophysiology department of the University Hospital of Geneva. Most notably, Dr. Beanumanoir is recognized as Righteous Among the Nations by Yad Vashem for rescuing and helping Jewish children during WWII.

Marianne Fillenz (New Zealand)

Dr. Fillenz is a Romanian-born New Zealand neuroscientist who researched the physiology of the autonomic nervous system. She published her first paper while still a medical student, on skeletal muscle and actions of acetylcholine. After completing her DPhil at the University of Oxford, she remained at Oxford for her entire life. Dr. Fillenz’s research is known for her pioneering use of voltammetry to measure dopamine and catecholamine release. You can find 2 of her well-known publications here:

Natalia Bekhtereva (Russia)

Dr. Bekhtereva is a neuroscientist and psychologist known for developing neurophysiological approaches to studying psychology. She is the granddaughter of Vladimir Bekhterev, who was a Russian neurologist and father of objective psychology and studies of the hippocampus in memory.

Maria Fitzgerald (United Kingdom)

Dr. Fitzgerald studies the neurophysiology of nociceptor (pain) circuits in the brain and spinal cord. Her research has made a significant contribution to our understanding of how pain perception emerged in early life and on pain sensitivity. She is currently a professor of Neuroscience at University College London.

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