Webinars

Investigating neuronal metabolism within the preserved cellular environment of acute brain slices

Upcoming webinar date: May 28, 2024 10:00 am
Original webinar date: April 30, 2024
Dr. Carlos Manlio Diaz Garcia obtained his undergraduate degree from the University of La Habana, Cuba, where he conducted research...

Dr. Carlos Manlio Diaz Garcia obtained his undergraduate degree from the University of La Habana, Cuba, where he conducted research on autonomic dysregulation in patients with spinocerebellar ataxia type 2. He later pursued his Master’s degree, studying zinc modulation of calcium channels in rat ventricular cardiomyocytes. His Ph.D. focused on the TRPV1 channel’s role in insulin secretion and glucose tolerance. As a postdoc at Harvard Medical School, he investigated energy demand and supply in the stimulated brain. Dr. Diaz Garcia is currently an Assistant Professor at the University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center, researching neuronal activity, metabolism, and brain insulin signaling.

In his upcoming webinar, Dr. Diaz Garcia will delve into the utilization of acute brain slices to explore cellular metabolic responses to neuronal stimulation. He will discuss the benefits of this model for visualizing neuronal metabolism using genetically encoded fluorescent biosensors, 2-photon fluorescence lifetime imaging, and electrophysiological readouts. Furthermore, he will present advancements in the preparation for proteomic and respirometry assays, shedding light on metabolic cooperation between astrocytes and neurons and the regulation of NADH dynamics by Ca2+ fluxes.

Learning Objectives:

  • Assess the advantages and disadvantages of using acute brain slices for studying neuronal metabolism.
  • Describe methodologies for visualizing neuronal metabolism in live brain tissue.
  • Analyze published research utilizing these methodologies in acute brain slices.
Dr. Carlos Manlio Díaz García, PhD

Carlos Manlio Diaz Garcia, PhD

Assistant Professor of Biochemistry and Physiology
University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center

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Investigating vaccine adjuvant-induced inflammation in human lymph nodes by precision-cut slices

Original webinar date: May 14, 2024
Dr. Joannah Fergusson is a Scientific Officer at the Kennedy Institute and the National Institute for Health and Care Research...
Dr. Joannah Fergusson is a Scientific Officer at the Kennedy Institute and the National Institute for Health and Care Research (NIHR) Biomedical Research Centre at the University of Oxford. Throughout her career, she has focused on human immunology and the development of in vitro models of human immunity. Currently, she employs these models to investigate the mechanisms of action of various vaccine modalities to design more effective vaccines against infectious diseases, including SARS-CoV-2. Her research aims to identify early events in inflammation within human lymph nodes that influence the generation of protective immunity. Additionally, her team seeks to extend this work to other tissues and chronic inflammatory diseases, with the goal of characterizing common inflammatory pathways and identifying potential therapeutic targets. In her presentation, she will discuss the development of precision-cut slicing of human lymph nodes, alongside state-of-the-art techniques such as single-cell RNASeq and hyperplexed imaging, to establish a model of adjuvant-induced inflammation.

In this webinar, Dr.Ferguson will:

  • Summarize the challenges associated with developing new vaccine modalities.
  • Introduce precision-cut lymph node slices as a model for vaccine studies, focusing on vaccine adjuvants.
  • Describe the mechanism of action of an open-source adjuvant derived from the study of human lymph node slices.
Dr. Joanna Ferguson

Joannah Fergusson, BSc, DPhil

Scientific Officer, Kennedy Institute & NIHR
University of Oxford

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Repeated mild Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI) causes sex-specific changes in cell proliferation and synaptic plasticity

Original webinar date: April 30, 2024
Dr. Christie earned his Ph.D. from the University of Otago, collaborating with Dr. W. “Cliff” Abraham in the renowned Graham...

Dr. Christie earned his Ph.D. from the University of Otago, collaborating with Dr. W. “Cliff” Abraham in the renowned Graham Goddard laboratory complex, where he investigated long-term depression of synaptic efficacy. Following this, he relocated to Houston, Texas, working alongside Dr. Daniel Johnston at Baylor College of Medicine. He then served as a HHMI post-doctoral fellow under the mentorship of Dr. Terry Sejnowski at the Salk Institute for Biological Sciences. In 1999, Dr. Christie embarked on his academic career at the University of South Dakota School of Medicine before joining the University of British Columbia (UBC) in 2001. At UBC, he played an integral role in the Brain Research Center, now known as the Djavad Mowafaghian Centre for Brain Health. Subsequently, in 2007, Dr. Christie established his laboratory at the newly formed UBC Island Medical Program in Victoria. His research endeavors focus on brain plasticity, with a particular emphasis on facilitating functional recovery in both acquired (e.g., brain injury) and congenital (e.g., FASD, FXS) neuropathological conditions in the aging brain.

In this webinar, Dr. Christie will:

  • Analyze the clinical relevance of closed-head impact models in mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI).
  • Evaluate the brain’s inflammatory pattern post-mTBI to discern the presence of a center of mass injury, rather than contre-coup.
  • Assess the impact of closed head injuries on the hippocampus as a crucial brain structure.
  • Examine the sex-specific alterations in brain plasticity subsequent to mTBI.

Brian Christie, PhD

Professor
University of Victoria

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Cellular Organization in Ventricular Wall Morphogenesis

Original webinar date: April 16, 2024
Dr. Mingfu Wu is an Associate Professor of Pharmacology at the University of Houston. With a background in genetics, developmental...

Dr. Mingfu Wu is an Associate Professor of Pharmacology at the University of Houston. With a background in genetics, developmental biology, and cellular biology, Dr. Wu’s research focuses on unraveling the intricate mechanisms underlying congenital heart defects and left ventricular noncompaction. His lab utilizes genetic, developmental, and cellular tools to investigate the etiologies of cardiac malformations and explore potential therapeutic interventions. In this webinar, Dr. Wu will delve into the fascinating world of cellular organization in ventricular wall morphogenesis, shedding light on how disruptions in cellular organization can lead to congenital heart defects.

In this webinar, Professor Wu will:

  • Explain the asymmetrical localization of β1 integrin in cardiomyocytes and its significance.
  • Discuss the role of β1 integrins in cardiomyocyte-ECM interactions and cellular organization.
  • Explore the consequences of Itgb1 deletion on cardiomyocyte-ECM engagement and tissue architecture formation.

Mingfu Wu, PhD

Associate Professor of Pharmacology
University of Houston

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Diminished Brain Angiogenesis in Offspring Affected by Preeclampsia

Original webinar date: April 2, 2024
Dr. Carlos Escudero is a distinguished medical doctor and Doctor in Biomedical Sciences, serving as a Full Professor at the...

Dr. Carlos Escudero is a distinguished medical doctor and Doctor in Biomedical Sciences, serving as a Full Professor at the University of Bio Bio in Chillan, Chile. With over two decades of dedicated research, Dr. Escudero’s work has focused on understanding vascular alterations in mothers, placenta, and offspring exposed to preeclampsia. His current research endeavors delve into the intricate relationship between placental dysfunction and impaired brain vasculature formation, particularly in brain blood vessel development and blood-brain barrier integrity. Dr. Escudero will present recent findings demonstrating reduced brain angiogenesis in offspring affected by preeclampsia, shedding light on potential cellular mechanisms, including alterations in brain endothelial cell migration. Notably, his groundbreaking work was featured on the cover of Hypertension in December 2024.

Learning Objectives:

  1. Explore how hypertension in pregnancy, specifically preeclampsia, can detrimentally affect brain function in offspring.
  2. Discuss the significance of brain angiogenesis in maintaining proper brain function.
  3. Examine the mechanisms through which preeclampsia disrupts brain angiogenesis in offspring.
Dr. Carlos Escudero

Carlos Escudero, MD-PhD

Professor, Vascular Physiology Laboratory
Universidad del Bio-Bio, Chile

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Cholinergic Signaling in the Habenula-Interpeduncular Nucleus Explains Sex Differences in Alcohol Reinforcement

Original webinar date: March 12, 2024
Dr. Junshi Wang is a distinguished neuroscientist specializing in addiction-induced neuroplasticity and its effects on motivated behaviors. Dr. Wang’s extensive...

Dr. Junshi Wang is a distinguished neuroscientist specializing in addiction-induced neuroplasticity and its effects on motivated behaviors. Dr. Wang’s extensive research journey spans various laboratories dedicated to drug addiction research, where he has developed a multidisciplinary approach incorporating electrophysiology, molecular biology, single-cell transcriptomics, and behavioral assessments. With a focus on unraveling the complex molecular foundations of addiction, Dr. Wang utilizes cutting-edge techniques such as single-cell RNA sequencing and multi-omics, particularly within the interpeduncular nucleus (IPN). His work not only enhances our understanding of addiction but also highlights the importance of collaborative research environments and mentorship. Through this webinar, Dr. Wang will explore key topics including the role of the IPN in addiction and mood regulation, the application of single-cell mRNA sequencing, and the neural mechanisms underlying gender-specific vulnerabilities to alcohol abuse.

In this webinar, Dr. Wang will delve into three key learning objectives:

  • Understanding the multifaceted role of the interpeduncular nucleus (IPN) in addiction and mood regulation.
  • Exploring the use of single-cell mRNA sequencing to generate hypotheses and enhance the identification of neurophysiological and circuit mechanisms through electrophysiology.
  • Deciphering the neural mechanisms underlying the distinct vulnerability to alcohol abuse observed between males and females.

Junshi Wang, PhD

Instructor, Drug Discovery Institute
Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai

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Phospholipase D Signaling in Health and Disease

Original webinar date: February 20, 2024
Professor Balaji Krishnan is an accomplished academician and Associate Professor, holding the prestigious Don and Nancy Mafrige Professorship in Neurodegenerative...

Professor Balaji Krishnan is an accomplished academician and Associate Professor, holding the prestigious Don and Nancy Mafrige Professorship in Neurodegenerative Diseases at the Mitchell Center for Neurodegenerative Diseases and the Department of Neurology at The University of Texas Medical Branch in Galveston, USA. Dr. Krishnan is deeply involved in exploring the molecular intricacies that underlie synaptic resilience in neurodegenerative states such as Alzheimer’s Disease (AD) and related dementias, including frontotemporal dementia (FTD). His expertise spans a wide range of research methodologies, from molecular biology to electrophysiology and behavior analysis, utilizing both human post-mortem brain tissues and translational animal models. In his forthcoming webinar titled “Phospholipase D Signalosome in Health and Disease,” Dr. Krishnan will delve into multimodal assessments in biomedical research, the importance of appropriate translational models, and the crucial role of synaptic function in defining neurological health and disease states in neuropsychiatric and neurodegenerative conditions. Join us to gain valuable insights into the cutting-edge work of Dr. Krishnan and its implications in the field of neurodegenerative research.

Learning Objectives for the Webinar:

  • Explore the use of multimodal assessments in the study of biomedical research.
  • Understand the significance of employing appropriate translational models to elucidate underlying mechanisms.
  • Recognize the pivotal role of synaptic function as a parameter for defining healthy and diseased neurological states in neuropsychiatric and neurodegenerative conditions, with a focus on Alzheimer’s Disease and related dementias.

Balaji Krishnan, PhD

Associate Professor, Department of Neurology
University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston

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Investigating lung development and regeneration using precision-cut lung slice (PCLS) models

Original webinar date: February 6, 2024
Dr. Dean leads a research group at Imperial College London’s National Heart and Lung Institute, specializing in lung development and...

Dr. Dean leads a research group at Imperial College London’s National Heart and Lung Institute, specializing in lung development and repair. Their mission is to leverage the similarities between lung development and disease to gain insights into lung disease pathobiology and pioneer innovative regenerative and repair strategies. Their research explores the potential of regenerative biology to restore damaged lungs, particularly in cases where repair is hindered by genetic mutations or repeated exposure to pollutants or smoking. Dr. Dean’s work centers on alveolar biology and involves the development of cutting-edge tools, including precision-cut lung slices, to advance the study of post-natal lung development and mechanisms of repair, which will be discussed in the upcoming webinar.

In this webinar, Dr. Dean will:

  • Summarize the significance of live imaging of lung slices in elucidating the processes involved in lung development.
  • Explain the key principles and components of the acid-injury and repair model, demonstrating an understanding of its relevance in studying lung repair and regeneration.
  • Demonstrate the process of achieving recombination of floxed alleles in lung slices ex-vivo, applying the techniques and methods discussed during the webinar.
Dr. Charlotte Dean

Charlotte Dean, PhD

Reader in Lung Development and Disease
National Heart and Lung Institute
Imperial College London

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Evaluating cell death in the gut during acute graft versus host disease (GvHD) in mice

Original webinar date: January 23, 2024
Dr. Shinohara is an immunologist who works on innate immune signaling in autoimmunity, neuroinflammation, and fungal infections. She has studied...

Dr. Shinohara is an immunologist who works on innate immune signaling in autoimmunity, neuroinflammation, and fungal infections. She has studied osteopontin (OPN) for two decades. She and her colleagues identified that OPN can be extracellular (sOPN) and intracellular (iOPN). She also initially identified that iOPN’s functions as a scaffold protein in signal transduction of multiple pattern recognition receptors. Her group generated a new mouse model to study OPN isoform-specific function. Dr. Shinohara is is an expert on sOPN-specific protective roles in aGvHD in the mouse model.

In this webinar, Dr. Shinohara will discuss how:

  • Osteopontin (OPN) expression is upregulated in various inflammatory conditions.
  • OPN is secreted by cells (sOPN), but alternative translation generates an isoform, intracellular OPN (iOPN).
  • Mouse model suggests that sOPN generated by CD4+ T cells protects hosts in acute graft versus host disease (aGvHD) – Approaches include precision-cut intestinal slices (PCIS)
  • sOPN protects intestinal epithelial cells from cell death and alters microbiome.

Mari Shinohara, PhD

Professor of Integrative Immunobiology
Duke University School of Medicine

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Imaging Cellular Metabolism: Investigating Nutrient Flexibility in Health and Disease

Original webinar date: December 12, 2023
Sui-Seng Tee received his undergraduate and graduate degree from the University of Cambridge, UK. He then transitioned to Stanford University...

Sui-Seng Tee received his undergraduate and graduate degree from the University of Cambridge, UK. He then transitioned to Stanford University and Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center for his postdoctoral training, before taking a faculty position at the University of Maryland. His lab currently investigates the biochemical processes governing how different tissues utilize extracellular nutrients. To do this, a combination of different approaches is used to measure metabolism, from destructive mass spectrometric techniques to non-invasive MRI scans. Current areas of focus in the lab include the role of fructose metabolism in liver inflammation and the ability to detect these changes using minimally invasive strategies.

In this webinar, Dr. Tee will:

  • Discuss strategies different cells and tissues use to ensure metabolic homeostasis
  • Introduce methods to detect and quantify metabolism
  • Describe metabolic signatures of disease, in vitro, in vivo and in human patients

Sui Seng Tee, PhD

Assistant Professor
Department of Diagnostic Radiology and Nuclear Medicine
University of Maryland School of Medicine

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Advances in In Vitro Modeling of Lung Diseases: Focus on Precision-Cut Lung Slices (PCLS) Model

Original webinar date: December 5, 2023
Dr. Hanan Osman-Ponchet is the accomplished Founder and CEO of PKDERM, a leading French biotech company specializing in innovative in...

Dr. Hanan Osman-Ponchet is the accomplished Founder and CEO of PKDERM, a leading French biotech company specializing in innovative in vitro solutions for assessing the efficacy and safety of pharmaceutical and cosmetic products. With over 20 years of experience in drug development at Sanofi and Galderma, she holds a PhD in Biochemistry, Cellular, and Molecular Biology. In 2019, Dr. Osman-Ponchet obtained a Global Executive-MBA degree in project management, innovation, and entrepreneurship, further enhancing her already impressive skill set. She has authored more than 30 peer-reviewed publications and patents and has been invited to deliver oral presentations at various scientific conferences.

The webinar explores the occurrence of diffuse alveolar damage, a significant factor in the progression of pulmonary diseases, leading to acute and/or chronic inflammatory processes. This phenomenon is observed in various conditions, including infectious diseases (e.g., COVID-19) and idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF), a progressive and fatal lung disease with poorly understood etiologies and cellular mechanisms. To address these knowledge gaps, Dr. Osman-Ponchet developed a model of lung fibrosis using human precision-cut lung slices (hPCLS). These slices impeccably preserve the native three-dimensional structure of the lung and encompass all lung cell types, rendering them an ideal in vitro model for exploring lung diseases and evaluating the safety, toxicity, and effectiveness of potential therapies.

During the webinar, the successful preparation of hPCLS from surgical lung resections of nine patients using the vibrating Microtome Compresstome® VF-300-0Z will be discussed, along with the induction of lung fibrosis using a specific profibrotic cocktail. Furthermore, the webinar covers various methodologies for accurately characterizing hPCLS and assessing the antifibrotic response of potential therapeutic agents.

This webinar provides a unique opportunity to gain insights from Dr. Hanan Osman-Ponchet’s pioneering work in the field of in vitro lung research. Attendees can expect an informative session that promises to deepen their understanding of lung diseases and their potential treatments.

Hanan Osman-Ponchet, PhD, E-MBA

CEO & Founder, PKDERM

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Perirhinal cortex hypoactivity underlies spatial learning deficits in three mouse models of autism spectrum disorder

Original webinar date: October 24, 2023
Dr. Rachel Keith earned her Ph.D. in Neuroscience at George Mason University in 2022. Her dissertation focused on determining the...

Dr. Rachel Keith earned her Ph.D. in Neuroscience at George Mason University in 2022. Her dissertation focused on determining the influence of NMDA receptors on spatial learning behavior, hippocampal plasticity and dendritic morphology across the postnatal period, resulting in three first-author publications (one under review). Currently, she is a postdoctoral fellow in Dr. Michelle Antoine’s lab researching the neurobiological underpinnings of spatial learning deficits in mouse models of autism spectrum disorder. Today, she will present her findings on how the perirhinal cortex, a region in the medial temporal lobe, may play a key role in spatial navigation impairments in autism mouse models.

In this webinar, Dr. Keith will:

  • Identify neuroscience techniques to determine biological basis of behavior
  • Understand how tissue sectioning can be used in a multitude of ways to support neuroscience research inquiries
  • Recognize the translational potential of animal models in neuroscience
  • Know more about autism mouse models and their neural activity

Rachel Keith, PhD

Postdoctoral Fellow
NIH/NIAAA

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Introduction into slice physiology approaches to understand circuit output

Original webinar date: October 10, 2023
Katherine Pizano is a graduate student working in the lab of Dr. Joshua Singer at the University of Maryland, College...

Katherine Pizano is a graduate student working in the lab of Dr. Joshua Singer at the University of Maryland, College Park. She received her Bachelor’s degree from Princeton University in molecular biology where she used in vivo calcium imaging techniques to study how dopaminergic activity encodes freezing behavior during auditory fear conditioning. Before starting her graduate studies, she also did a post baccalaureate fellowship at the NIH, investigating how neuropeptidergic input to gonadotropin releasing hormone (GnRH) neurons is affected during development.

In her current lab, the Singer lab is interested in understanding how the underlying synaptic transmission and intrinsic properties of individual cell types shape circuit outputs. The mammalian retina is a model circuit for this, given that physiological function is well-understood — i.e., it takes light and transforms it into a signal that the brain can process. More recently, inquiry has expanded to include retinorecipient circuits involved in non-image forming behavior(e.g. light effects on mood and motivation). Her doctoral work, specifically, explores how PACAP neuropeptidergic modulation by ipRGCs affects synaptic communication in two key regions (the SCN and PHb), using a combination of whole-cell patch recordings and behavioral paradigms.

In this webinar, Katherine Pizano will:

  • Describe slice preparations for electrophysiological recordings
  • Discuss how to use optogenetic stimulation as a tool in understanding local synaptic transmission in retinal and retinorecipient pathways
  • Explore PACAP neuromodulation in retinorecipient pathways

Katherine Pizano, B.A.

Joshua Singer Lab
University of Maryland

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Techniques for 3-dimensional lineage tracing during tumorigeneses

Original webinar date: September 26, 2023
Dr. Snyder leads the Cancer Initiation and Cancer Cell Behavior lab at Duke University. Their research mission is to unravel...

Dr. Snyder leads the Cancer Initiation and Cancer Cell Behavior lab at Duke University. Their research mission is to unravel the mysteries of how cancer cells adapt and thrive in the crucial pre-diagnosis phase. Additionally, Dr. Snyder’s lab plays a pivotal role in the Center for Applied Therapeutics, where their cutting-edge models are shared as invaluable tools for preclinical and translational research.

At the heart of their work lies a profound fascination with the earliest stages of tumorigenesis, where cancer cells and their intricate ecosystems adapt to give rise to aggressive, metastatic cancers. Leveraging innovative cancer rainbow models (Crainbow) and hyperspectral techniques, Dr. Snyder’s lab explores tumor initiation with unprecedented spatial and temporal resolution. Their interdisciplinary approach spans systems biology, single-cell analyses, and genetic engineering, making for a dynamic and far-reaching research agenda.

In this webinar, Dr. Snyder will:

  • Discuss the use of cancer rainbow mice for tracing genetic heterogeneity during tumorigenesis.
  • Explore the intricacies of imaging and tissue processing for 3D lineage tracing.

Joshua Snyder, PhD

Associate Professor (Surgery, Cell Biology, Pharmacology and Cancer Biology)
Duke University

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HIV antigen persistence in lymph node T follicular helper cells is mitigated by functional virus-specific responses during hyperacute-treated HIV-1 infection

Original webinar date: August 22, 2023
Omolara Olujimi Baiyegunhi (Ph.D.) is a Wellcome Trust early career fellow and research associate at the Africa Health Research Institute,...

Omolara Olujimi Baiyegunhi (Ph.D.) is a Wellcome Trust early career fellow and research associate at the Africa Health Research Institute, Durban, South Africa. She was a SANTHE post-doc fellow from October 2018 to January 2023, and also an honorary research fellow at University College London (UCL), UK, between 2020 and 2021. She received her Ph.D. in immunology from the University of KwaZulu-Natal in 2018. In her current research, she aims to identify the virological and metabolic factors that influence the development and persistence of HIV-1 reservoirs. Omolara is passionate about excellence in scientific research and the training of the next generation of scientists. Long-term, she wants to develop therapeutics and vaccines to improve the health of communities with high-disease burdens, such as HIV-1 infection. She has presented at numerous conferences and co-authored several publications.

HIV persistence in tissue sites despite antiretroviral therapy (ART) is a major barrier to HIV cure. The very early initiation of ART can lead to prolonged remission when treatment is interrupted but this is an infrequent occurrence. In most individuals, virus rebound occurs within weeks to months even in individuals initiated on ART during Fiebig stage I (hyperacute) HIV infection despite rapid suppression of viremia and dramatically lower numbers of latently infected cells in peripheral blood. The underlying immunological and virologic mechanisms responsible for the diverse viral rebound kinetics remain unknown. Dr. Baiyegunhi’s research seeks to understand the mechanisms underlying HIV reservoir persistence during ART to inform HIV eradication/cure strategies. In this talk, Dr. Baiyegunhi will present on HIV antigen persistence in lymph nodes following ART initiation in Fiebig stage I and provide insights into the immune mechanisms impacting HIV persistence and clearance in tissue sanctuary sites.

In this webinar, Dr. Baiyegunhi will help us:

  • Understand the impact of the timing of antiretroviral therapy initiation on T follicular helper cell responses in HIV patients.
  • Explore the persistence of HIV antigens in lymph nodes and its implications for disease progression.
  • Examine the role of HIV-specific CD8 T cells in clearing antigens from lymph node tissue sanctuary sites and its potential therapeutic significance.

Omolara Olujimi Baiyegunhi, PhD

Research Associate, Wellcome Trust Early-Career Fellow
Africa Health Research Institute

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Cell motility in glioblastoma

Original webinar date: August 8, 2023
Dr. Natanael Zarco, a Research Associate at Mayo Clinic in Jacksonville, Florida, USA, specializes in brain tumor studies, particularly glioblastoma...

Dr. Natanael Zarco, a Research Associate at Mayo Clinic in Jacksonville, Florida, USA, specializes in brain tumor studies, particularly glioblastoma (GBM) biology. With a strong academic background, he holds a B.Sc. in Chemical Pharmaceutical Biology from UABJO, Mexico, and earned his MSc and Ph.D. in Cellular and Molecular Neurobiology at CINVESTAV, Mexico City.

Currently, Dr. Zarco’s research is focused on exploring the interaction of GBM with the subventricular zone (SVZ), a significant neurogenic niche that houses Neural Stem Cells (NSCs). His study delves into how glioblastoma stem cells invade the SVZ and other brain regions. In his talk, he will discuss the importance of cell migration in the spread of cancer cells throughout the brain and how developing more physiological models can aid in understanding the regulation of this process, ultimately leading to the design of novel therapeutic agents.

In this webinar, Dr. Zarco will:

  • Summarize the characteristics of brain tumors with a particular focus on glioblastoma.
  • Explain the importance of cell migration in cancer progression and prognosis.
  • Examine the need to develop experimental tumor models to study cancer cell migration.

Natanael Zarco, PhD

Research Associate, Department of Cancer Biology
Mayo Clinic, FL

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Heme-induced injury on precision-cut lung slices (PCLS)

Original webinar date: June 27, 2023
Dr. Fytianos completed his PhD in Biology at the University of Fribourg in Switzerland. During his PhD, he investigated nanoparticle...

Dr. Fytianos completed his PhD in Biology at the University of Fribourg in Switzerland. During his PhD, he investigated nanoparticle interactions with human immune cells and advanced in vitro models for respiratory diseases. Afterwards, he pursued postdoctoral research in biomedicine and translational medicine, with a focus on respiratory disease models (in vitro and in vivo). Since 2019, he has worked for CSL Behring R&D department as a Senior Scientist. He currently leads several projects in the respiratory therapeutic area that are at a preclinical stage. His team focuses on relevant and physiological in vitro and ex vivo experimental disease models that could support later stages of development.

In this webinar, Dr. Fytianos will:

  • Discuss the characterization of heme-induced injury on PCLS
  • Explain methods optimization in producing high-quality PCLS
  • Discuss clinical and research translatability of PCLS

Kleanthis Fytianos, PhD

Senior Scientist, Manager

CSL Behring Center for Biologics Research, Switzerland

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Leveraging primary lung tissue to develop “cutting”-edge lung cell culture models

Original webinar date: June 13, 2023
Anne van der Does, Ph.D. is an Assistant Professor at the Department of Pulmonology at the Leiden University Medical Center in the...

Anne van der Does, Ph.D. is an Assistant Professor at the Department of Pulmonology at the Leiden University Medical Center in the Netherlands. Her work is focused on (dysfunctional) lung epithelial biology in chronic lung diseases, with specific focus on developing advanced lung epithelial cell cultures to support that research. Related to this focus, dr. van der Does was awarded a Marie Curie fellowship twice, of which the second included a one-year visit at Emulate Inc. -a pioneer company in Organs-on-Chips technology- to use their Lung-on-Chip platform. Dr. van der Does has published in peer-review journals including the European Respiratory Journal.

Dr. van der Does received her Ph.D. from the Department of Infectious Diseases at the LUMC before completing a 4-year postdoc at the Karolinska Institutet, in Stockholm, Sweden after which she continued her career in the PulmoScience Lab of the LUMC (www.pulmosciencelableiden.com).

In this webinar Dr. van der Does will:

  • Discuss how application of stretch and airflow affects mucociliary clearance in a primary Airway Lung-on-Chip
  • How the vibrating microtome is used to slice the chips for imaging purposes
  • Shortly touch upon new research into COVID-19-related lung fibrosis featuring PCLS and Organ-on-Chip technology

Anne van der Does, PhD

Assistant Professor

PulmoScience Lab | Department of Pulmonology | Leiden University Medical Center

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Voltage- and current-clamp recordings of SCN neurons

Original webinar date: May 30, 2023
Dr. Zhao-Wen Wang is a professor in the Department of Neuroscience at University of Connecticut School of Medicine. Dr. Wang’s...

Dr. Zhao-Wen Wang is a professor in the Department of Neuroscience at University of Connecticut School of Medicine. Dr. Wang’s lab studies chemical and electrical synapses using the nematode C. elegans as a model. A research focus of Dr. Wang’s lab is to identify previously unknown regulators of the BK channel using a forward genetics approach. His lab has identified several proteins that are required for BK channel function in vivo. Following a recent discovery of a BK channel regulator in C. elegans by Dr. Wang lab, they have moved to exploring whether the regulatory mechanism is conserved in mammals using a variety of approaches, including electrophysiological analyses with mouse brain slices.

In this webinar, Dr. Wang will:

  • Discus how melatonin regulates neurotransmitter release and sleep behavior by activating Slo1 (the BK channel) in C. elegans
  • Explain how melatonin may activate mammalian Slo1 in a heterologous expression system through a specific melatonin receptor, MT1
  • Define how MT1 physically interacts with Slo1
  • Examine how knockout of MT1 enhances neuronal excitability in SCN neurons

Zhao-Wen Wang, PhD

Professor

Dept. of Neuroscience

University of Connecticut, School of Medicine

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Precision-cut lung slices (PCLS) in airway contractility

Original webinar date: May 23, 2023
The studies of Dr. Andreacarola Urso have largely focused on different phases of lung disease, including respiratory disease progression, transplantation...

The studies of Dr. Andreacarola Urso have largely focused on different phases of lung disease, including respiratory disease progression, transplantation and graft rejection. Currently, Dr. Urso’s chief area of interest is immunometabolism in the context of bacterial pneumonias in cystic fibrosis, which also eventually leads to lung transplantation. Pharmacological testing as well as mechanical responses are challenging to study in the human lung. Dr. Urso will talk about how the use of precision-cut lung slices (PCLS) has facilitated her studies on airway contractility and pharmacological delivery.

In this webinar, Dr. Urso will:

  • Discuss the use of human and mouse lung tissue for PCLS
  • Explain how lung PCLS can be used to measure airway contractility and gene expression in airway smooth muscle
  • Explain how lung PCLS can be used for TEM analysis of drug delivery efficiency
  • Andreacarola Urso, PhD, PhD

    Columbia University

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    Characterization of Biomechanical and Biotransport Properties of Meniscus: Investigating Their Relationships with Tissue Structure and Composition

    Original webinar date: April 25, 2023
    Dr. Francesco Travascio is an Associate Professor at the Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering Department of the University of Miami, where...

    Dr. Francesco Travascio is an Associate Professor at the Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering Department of the University of Miami, where he directs the Musculoskeletal Biomechanics Laboratory. He is also Associate Director of the Max Biedermann Institute for Biomechanics at Mount Sinai Medical Center in Miami Beach. He received is B.S. and M.S. in Materials Engineering at the University of Naples Federico II (Italy) in 2001, and a Ph.D. in Chemical Engineering in 2004. He also holds a doctoral degree in Biomedical Engineering (University of Miami, 2009). Before his academic appointment at the University of Miami, he worked for two years as a bioengineer at MAKO Surgical, Inc. (now MAKO Stryker, Inc.). His expertise is in the areas of occupational and sports biomechanics, as well as orthopedics.

    The meniscus is a fibrocartilaginous tissue in the knee that plays an essential role in load distribution, congruency, and joint stability. Accordingly, the presence of a healthy and functioning meniscus is necessary for proper joint biomechanics. Traumatic failures, such as meniscal tears are the most frequent type of injury to the meniscus, especially in active younger adults. Repair of tears via surgical suturing decreases the development of osteoarthritis and subsequent need for joint replacement, but its rate of success is limited. The ultimate goal of Dr. Travascio’s research is to develop a long-lasting treatment for meniscus tears based on regeneration of the tissue and preservation of its function. He believes that a scaffold closely mimicking structure and composition, as well as biomechanical and biotransport properties of a healthy native tissue will integrate into the meniscus and will regenerate meniscal tissue at the defect. Unfortunately, to date, little investigation has been conducted on biomechanics and biotransport in meniscus. In this talk, Dr. Travascio will present his research advances in understanding the biomechanical behavior of the meniscus and its transport properties in relation to its unique compositional and structural features.

    In this webinar, Dr. Travascio will:

    • Describe the key functions, structures and composition of the meniscus in the knee
    • Explain experimental methods for characterizing tissue transport and mechanical properties for the meniscus

    Francesco Travascio, PhD

    Associate Professor

    Dept. of Mechanical & Aerospace Engineering

    University of Miami

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    The locus coeruleus (LC) mediates behavioral flexibility

    Original webinar date: April 11, 2023
    Dr. Greta Vargova grew up in Slovakia where she pursued her undergraduate studies in molecular biology and PhD in neuroscience....

    Dr. Greta Vargova grew up in Slovakia where she pursued her undergraduate studies in molecular biology and PhD in neuroscience. In her doctoral research at the Slovak Academy of Sciences, Dr. Vargova co-developed, applied and characterized several types of adeno-associated viral vectors expressing human truncated tau and red fluorophore mCherry in equal ratio.

    These AAV vectors were developed to induce Alzheimer’s disease-like pathology in wildtype mice. She performed two-photon calcium imaging in awake mice to investigate the effects of developing neurodegeneration on cortical circuits. Dr. Vargova also had the opportunity to participate in long-term research at Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory, where she studied the role of cortical feedback projections in sensory perception.

    Currently, Dr. Vargova is a third year postdoctoral researcher at UCR Riverside in the laboratory of Professor Hongdian Yang. She studies somatosensory perception and cognitive flexibility, for which they have developed a novel, tactile based rule-shift behavioral assay.

    For this webinar, she is going to present their most recent publication, in which they show the link between locus coeruleus activity and behavioral flexibility.

    Greta Vargova, PhD

    Postdoc, lab of Hongdian Yang

    University of California, Riverside

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    Using calcium imaging and electrophysiology to explore the interaction between neurons and astrocytes in addiction

    Original webinar date: March 7, 2023
    Dr. Junshi Wang is an enthusiastic neuroscientist who has been investigating neural mechanisms underlying drug addiction for 14 years. He earned...

    Dr. Junshi Wang is an enthusiastic neuroscientist who has been investigating neural mechanisms underlying drug addiction for 14 years. He earned his PhD in Neuroscience from Arizona State University, where he was mentored by Drs. Ron Hammer and Ella Nikulina. While there, he used behavioral models and immunohistochemistry to comprehensively investigate how brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) signaling in the brain reward circuit regulates stress-exacerbated addictive behaviors. In his first postdoc training period (2014-2020), in Dr. Yan Dong’s lab at the University of Pittsburgh, he learned electrophysiology. Since then, he has been using electrophysiology to study neuroplasticity in addiction. Currently he is a postdoc in Dr. Paul Kenny’s lab, at Mount Sinai School of Medicine. Dr. Wang enjoys making modifications to procedures and instruments to gain better control at each experimental step, ultimately leading to better-quality data.

    In this webinar, Dr. Wang will:

    • Discuss to quantify nascent silent synapses using electrophysiology
    • Explore how to perform ex vivo calcium imaging on brain slices
    • Share tips & tricks of brain sectioning to help reduce frustration for electrophysiology recordings

    Junshi Wang, PhD

    Instructor, Department of Neuroscience

    Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai

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    Tumor Slice Organoids for Cancer Precision Therapy

    Original webinar date: February 21, 2023
    Chen-Yuan Dong completed his PhD in physics at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign in 1998. After completing postdoctoral training...

    Chen-Yuan Dong completed his PhD in physics at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign in 1998. After completing postdoctoral training at MIT as an NIH postdoctoral fellow, Dr. Dong joined the Department of Physic at National Taiwan University where he is now a Distinguished Professor of Physics. He specializes in the development and applications of optical microscopy for biological and biomedical research. Dr. Dong is a Fellow of both Optica (formerly Optical Society of America) and the International Society for Optics and Photonics (SPIE). He also serves on the editorial board of the Journal of Biomedical Optics.

    In this webinar, Dr. Dong will:

    • Discuss how cancer treatment decisions are made largely based on clinical guidelines
    • Explain how tumor slice organoids are a promising approach for delivering precise cancer therapy through biomarker search and phenotypic cancer drug susceptibility testing
    • Explore how rapid processing of tumor specimen into sliced organoids is important in preserving morphological and molecular fidelity

    Chen-Yuan Dong, PhD

    Distinguished Professor

    Dept. of Physics

    National Taiwan University

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    Interactions between Saturated Fat, Cytokines, and Microglia in the Ventral Striatum

    Original webinar date: February 7, 2023
    Dr. Fordahl will highlight how proinflammatory cytokines alter dopamine terminal function, and how increasing dietary fat intake may enhance microglial...

    Dr. Fordahl will highlight how proinflammatory cytokines alter dopamine terminal function, and how increasing dietary fat intake may enhance microglial activity. The Fordahl Lab’s primary research interests are to examine how the excessive intake of high fat or high sugar foods alter brain function, leading to dysregulated food intake. They are interested in how prolonged consumption of a palatable diet degrades the perception of natural rewards by altering dopamine signaling in response to food. Their lab pairs a pre-clinical rodent model of obesity with electrochemistry, immunochemistry, and other biological endpoints with behavioral markers of dopamine system function.

    In this webinar, Dr. Fordahl will:

    • Demonstrate our lab’s use of the Compresstome in electrochemistry experiments.
    • Outline how a dietary saturated fat alters dopamine kinetics.
    • Identify the role of inflammation and inflammatory response cells in this process.

    Steve Fordahl, PhD

    Assistant Professor

    Dept. of Nutrition

    UNC Greensboro

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    Spatiotemporal Coordination of Stem Cell Behavior Following Alveolar Injury

    Original webinar date: January 31, 2023
    In his PhD in Molecular Biology, working with Ben Hankamer at the Institute for Molecular Bioscience, University of Queensland, Dr....

    In his PhD in Molecular Biology, working with Ben Hankamer at the Institute for Molecular Bioscience, University of Queensland, Dr. Maurizio Chioccioli led a large-scale, high-throughput analysis to develop next generation microalgae systems for commercial (biofuels) applications. This work ignited his passion for quantitative imaging of dynamical systems, which he then pursued in a short postdoc at University of Cambridge, UK in the Department of Applied Mathematics and Theoretical Physics under Ray Goldstein. While there, Dr. Chioccioli invented a novel live video-microscopy platform and worked closely with mathematicians and physicists to study dynamic flagella beating and trajectory of single-cell C. reinhardtii. Turning to the biomedical field, in the lab of Pietro Cicuta at the Cavendish Laboratory at University of Cambridge, he applied these same modeling principles capture dynamic ciliary beating via high-speed video-microscopy. He co-invented new quantitative approaches to assess drug efficacy in Cystic Fibrosis patients and to characterize and potentially diagnose different variants of Primary Ciliary Dyskinesia. Dr. Chioccioli was recruited to Yale School of Medicine in 2018, where he is now Instructor under the mentorship of Naftali Kaminski in the Section for Pulmonary, Critical Care and Sleep Medicine. His appointment has provided him the intellectual freedom and independence to pursue research interests in alveolar injury and regeneration and specifically the role of AT2 cells in these processes. In his most significant body of work to date, he led a study to define the dynamic spatiotemporal coordination of alveolar stem cells in response to injury and discovered motility of these cells as a new cellular mechanism through which the alveolar injury response is coordinated.

    In this webinar, Dr. Chioccioli will:

    • Describe motility of alveolar stem cells as a new injury response mechanism in the lung and reveal properties of stem cell motility at high cellular resolution
    • Explain early highly dynamic behavior of AT2 cells post injury, including migration within and between alveoli
    • Characterize the emergence of at least three distinct morphokinetic AT2 cell states associated with AT2 stem cell injury response
    • Show how small molecule-based inhibition of Rho-associated protein kinase (ROCK) pathway significantly reduced motility of AT2 stem cells following injury and reduced expression of Krt8, a known marker of intermediate progenitor cells

    Maurizio Chioccioli, PhD

    Assistant Professor of Medicine (Pulmonary)

    Yale University

    School of Medicine

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    Precision cut lung slices (PCLS) for probing mechanisms of pulmonary fibrosis

    Original webinar date: January 17, 2023
    Claudia Loebel, M.D./Ph.D. is an Assistant Professor of Materials Science & Engineering and a Biological Sciences Scholar at the University...

    Claudia Loebel, M.D./Ph.D. is an Assistant Professor of Materials Science & Engineering and a Biological Sciences Scholar at the University of Michigan, US. She obtained her MD (2011) at the Martin-Luther University Halle-Wittenberg in Germany and PhD (2016) at ETH Zurich (Switzerland), before completing a postdoctoral fellowship in the laboratory of Professor Jason Burdick at the University of Pennsylvania. She was awarded the Pathway to Independence Award (K99/R00) through the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute at NIH for her work on synthetic lung tissue models to probe mechanisms of alveolar epithelial cell dysfunction. Her research involves the development of PCLS to probe mechanisms of early epithelial cell differentiation during lung injury and fibrosis.

    In this webinar, Dr. Loebel will:

    • Describe the technical development of PCLS with a focus on epithelial cells
    • Explain the necessary culture conditions for optimal PCLS in pulmonary fibrosis research
    • Discuss the imaging and quantification of PCLS metrics in pulmonary fibrosis

    Claudia Loebel, MD-PhD​

    Assistant Professor

    Materials Science * Engineering

    University of Michigan

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    Precision cut lung slices (PCLS): A novel ex vivo model to study lung disease

    Original webinar date: December 2, 2023
    Professor Koziol-White received her graduate degree from University of Wisconsin-Madison in Cellular and Molecular Pharmacology examining mechanisms of eosinophil survival...

    Professor Koziol-White received her graduate degree from University of Wisconsin-Madison in Cellular and Molecular Pharmacology examining mechanisms of eosinophil survival and activation in allergic asthma. Her first postdoctoral fellowship was with Angela Haczku (Hasku) at University of Pennsylvania studying ozone and allergen-induced mechanisms of dendritic cell activation in the lung. Her second postdoc was with Reynold Panettieri Jr. at University of Pennsylvania, where she has been examining airway physiology and modulation of airway smooth muscle function in asthma and other respiratory disorders.

    Dr. Koziol-White has published 59 peer-reviewed journal articles, 5 book chapters, and mentored ~35 students at various stages of their career. Here, her webinar will showcase the versatility of the precision cut lung slice system that she has developed and utilized to study airway function for almost two decades.

    In this webinar, Dr. Koziol-White will discuss:

    • How the laboratory generates precision cut lung slices utilizing the VF-300 vibratome
    • How to measure airway lumen changes to assess airway constriction and relaxation
    • How allergen exposure/mast cell activation elicits airway contraction
    • How pathogen, toxicant, and inflammatory mediator exposure change airway tone

    Cynthia Koziol-White, PhD​

    Assistant Professor, Department of Pharmacology

    Robert Wood Johnson Medical School

    Rutgers University

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    Investigating how sodium channels regulate the firing of cerebellar Purkinje neurons requires healthy brain slices

    Original webinar date: November 15, 2023
    Dr. Joseph Ransdell completed his undergraduate degree in Neuroscience at the University of Minnesota. He then completed his Ph.D. at...

    Dr. Joseph Ransdell completed his undergraduate degree in Neuroscience at the University of Minnesota. He then completed his Ph.D. at the University of Missouri Columbia and studied the regulation of membrane excitability in crab motor neurons. After receiving his Ph.D., he joined the lab of Jeanne Nerbonne at Washington University. There, he continued using electrophysiological methods to test how ion channel accessory proteins regulate the excitability of various types of mouse central neurons. In 2020, Dr. Ransdell started his independent lab at Miami University in Oxford, OH. He continues to work with mouse models and his team has centered their focus on the regulation of voltage-gated sodium channels and the contributions of the channels to the functioning of cerebellar circuits during health and disease.

    In this webinar, Dr. Ransdell explores how the Compresstome vibrating microtome is used to produce healthy brain slices for electrophysiology. He studies adult Purkinje neurons in mouse cerebellar brain slices.

    Joseph L. Ransdell, PhD​

    Assistant Professor,

    Assistant Professor, Department of Biology

    Miami University

    Oxford, OH

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    Slicing up the tumor: Lessons from attempted lung tumor slice cultures

    Original webinar date: September 20, 2023
    Dr. Tsilingiri was born and raised in Athens, Greece. She studied Biochemistry and Biotechnology in Thessaly and then completed research...

    Dr. Tsilingiri was born and raised in Athens, Greece. She studied Biochemistry and Biotechnology in Thessaly and then completed research training in Spain, Italy and Scotland. Her main expertise is on basic immunology and aspects of the interplay between nutrition and the immune system. She has extensive experience in explant slice cultures.

    Currently, she is working on tumor immunotherapy and using the Compresstome vibrating microtome to examine the interaction between tumor tissues and autologous lymph node cells in slice cultures. This work is being carried out in the frame of an EU-funded Consortium, Tumour-LNoC (Tumour-Lymph node on a chip), with the ultimate goal of mimicking the metastatic process on a chip and monitor metastasizing cells in real time.

    In this webinar, Dr. Tsilingiri explores how she uses the Compresstome vibrating microtome to make healthy tumor slices in her research of lung cancer.

    Katerina Tsilingiri, PhD

    Biomedical Research Foundation

    Academy of Athens (BRFAA)

    Greece

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    From two-dimensional to three-dimensional histopathology using a Compresstome®

    Original webinar date: July 12, 2023
    Terence Tsz Wai Wong received his B.Eng. and M.Phil. degrees both from the University of Hong Kong in 2011 and...

    Terence Tsz Wai Wong received his B.Eng. and M.Phil. degrees both from the University of Hong Kong in 2011 and 2013, respectively. He studied Biomedical Engineering at Washington University in St. Louis (WUSTL) and Medical Engineering at California Institute of Technology (Caltech), under the tutelage of Prof. Lihong V. Wang (member of the National Academy of Engineering and Inventors) for his Ph.D. degree. Right after his Ph.D. graduation, he joined the Hong Kong University of Science and Technology (HKUST) as an Assistant Professor in the Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering (CBE). He is also the Director of the HKUST Research Center for Medical Imaging and Analysis (CMIA). With the integration of optical/photoacoustic imaging and deep-learning algorithms, his research focuses on developing smart optical and photoacoustic devices to enable label-free and high-speed histological imaging, three-dimensional whole-organ imaging, and low-cost cancer-targeting deep-tissue imaging. He is an author or co-author of over 50 publications in top peer-reviewed journals (including Nature Photonics, Nature Methods, Nature Communications, Science Advances, Advanced Science, etc), conference papers, and book chapters, and has five U.S. patents.

    In this webinar, Dr. Wong shares how he built a custom-made Compresstome® for high-speed histological 3D imaging of whole organs like brains.

    Terence Wong, PhD

    Assistant Professor, Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering (CBE)

    Director, Research Center for Medical Imaging and Analysis (CMIA)

    Hong Kong University of Science and Technology (HKUST)

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    Using the Compresstome® in Immunotherapy Research

    Original webinar date: May 23, 2022
    Dr Astero Klampatsa (PhD) is a Team Leader in Cancer Immunotherapy at the Institute of Cancer Research, London, UK and...

    Dr Astero Klampatsa (PhD) is a Team Leader in Cancer Immunotherapy at the Institute of Cancer Research, London, UK and a Senior Lecturer in King’s College London, UK. She was awarded a PhD in Research Oncology (focused in mesothelioma apoptotic and hypoxia pathways) from Queen Mary’s College, University of London, UK. As a postdoctoral fellow, she gained expertise in CAR T cell immunotherapy and immunobiology of thoracic cancers at King’s College London, UK, and at the University of Pennsylvania, USA. Since 2019, Dr Klampatsa has been leading her own team, the Thoracic Oncology Immunotherapy Group, focusing on developing novel CAR T cell therapies for mesothelioma and lung cancer, as well as the immunobiology of these malignancies for identification of markers of response to immunotherapy.

    In this webinar, Dr. Klampatsa will discuss how the Compresstome® was used to create precision-cut tumor slices (PCTS) as an ex vivo model for immunotherapy research.

    Astero Klampatsa, PhD

    Team Leader in Cancer Immunotherapy

    Institute of Cancer Research, London

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    “3D” use of animal tissues in experimental design

    Original webinar date: March 1, 2022
    Have you wondered how one mouse brain may be used for multiple experiments? Come discover the strategy behind using animal...

    Have you wondered how one mouse brain may be used for multiple experiments? Come discover the strategy behind using animal tissues for multi-use research experiments, so that your tissue samples can go further.

    Dr. Yiying Zhang from Harvard Medical School and Massachusetts General Hospital is our guest webinar speaker.

    Dr. Yiying Zhang has been studying neuropathogenesis, anesthesia neurotoxicity, anesthesia/surgery toxicity, postoperative neurocognitive disorder and postoperative delirium (POD) in Alzheimer’s disease (AD) since 2009. Specifically, she has studied the effects of anesthetics on mitochondrial function in vitro and in vivo, as well as the potential association between neuroinflammation and mitochondrial function following the anesthesia and/or surgery. Recently, Dr. Zhang has focused on studying potential gut microbiota-neuroinflammation-mitochondria cascade in the pathogenesis of POD. For this Precisionary webinar, Dr. Zhang will discuss a “3D” use of animal tissues in planning experimental designs in academic research.

    Yiying Zhang, MD-PhD

    Assistant Professor of Anesthesia

    Massachusetts General Hospital

    Harvard Medical School

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    Making precision-cut tissue slices for ex vivo assay services

    Original webinar date: September 14, 2021
    Have you wondered about how to make precision-cut tissue slices and their experimental applications? Precisionary Instruments has worked with Visikol,...

    Have you wondered about how to make precision-cut tissue slices and their experimental applications? Precisionary Instruments has worked with Visikol, a contract research services company focused on leveraging advanced imaging, 3D cell culture assays and digital pathology to accelerate the drug discovery and development process.

    In this webinar, Visikol experts explain the need for in vitro liver models to study livery injury. Our guest speakers demonstrate the standard assay format for creating precision-cut liver slices (PCLS), explain how the Compresstome® VF-310-0Z vibrating microtome helps create uniform tissue slices that can be meaningfully compared between treatments, go through how to use the Compresstome® step-by-step for making PCLS, and discuss how slices are made from normal human liver tissue, diseased human liver tissue, and mouse model liver.

    Ian MacCloud

    Director of Operations

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    Using electrophysiological methods to examine e-cigarette flavors’ effect on dopamine neuron function

    Original webinar date: July 6, 2021
    Dr. Henderson is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Biomedical Sciences at Marshall University’s Joan C. Edwards School of...

    Dr. Henderson is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Biomedical Sciences at Marshall University’s Joan C. Edwards School of Medicine. He received a BS (with distinction) in Chemistry at The Ohio State University, where he started research, initially as an Analytical Chemist in the lab of Dr. John Olesik. He went on to receive his PhD in Pharmacology at The Ohio State University in the lab of Dr. Dennis McKay. Afterwards, his professional journey continued his development as a NIDA-NIH Postdoctoral Fellow at the California Institute of Technology in the lab of Dr. Henry Lester. Before starting his faculty position at Marshall University, Dr. Henderson also trained as a visiting postdoctoral fellow at Yale University (under Dr Nii Addy and Dr. Marina Picciotto).

    In addition to his responsibilities at Marshall University, Dr. Henderson is now one of two co-Chairs for the Basic Science Network in the Society for Research on Nicotine and Tobacco (www.SRNT.org).

    The Henderson lab focuses on the role tobacco and vaping flavors play in addiction-related behaviors. Thus far, we have shown that menthol and green apple flavors can enhance nicotine vapor self-administration and do so by directly altering dopamine neurons in the midbrain.

    Brandon Henderson, PhD

    Assistant Professor Joan C. Edwards School of Medicine at Marshall University

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    Reflections on a decade of patching in adult brain slices

    Original webinar date: March 22, 2021
    Jonathan T. Ting is an Assistant Investigator at the Allen Institute, where he joined in 2013 to provide electrophysiology expertise...

    Jonathan T. Ting is an Assistant Investigator at the Allen Institute, where he joined in 2013 to provide electrophysiology expertise for the Human Cell Types program, and to develop functional assays on human ex vivo brain slides. Dr. Ting has more than 15 years of experience in patch clamp electrophysiology. He studied the neural circuitry basis of psychiatric disorders during his postdoctoral fellowships at Duke University and the McGovern Institute for Brain Research at MIT, and he developed and characterized several transgenic mouse lines now widely employed for nervous system research involving optogenetics.

    For this webinar, Dr. Ting provides reflections of his experience on a decade of patching adult brain slices. He will:

    • Discuss which key steps in the brain slice process is most important and why
    • Challenge our conventional beliefs of slicing solutions and methodologies
    • Recommend tips and tricks based on his experience and research

    Jonathan Ting, PhD

    Associate Investigator Allen Institute